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  • Make your own no sew curtains

    MAKE YOUR OWN NO SEW CURTAINS

     
     

    Image of a finished no sew curtain using clipsCurtains that are sewn together in the traditional way are sturdier and last longer but serviceable, unlined lightweight curtains can be made with no sewing at all. A modern bonding web (Bondaweb is probably the best well known, but there are others) is applied with a hot iron and a damp cloth and takes the place of a needle and thread. If more than one width of fabric is required in each curtain a bonding strip can be used to join the widths together.

    There are a number of curtain heading styles which are suitable for no sew curtains. These include, cased headed, eyelet, heading tape and curtain clips.

    The instructions below are for no sew curtains using curtain clips.

    NO SEW CURTAINS USING CLIPS

    This is the easiest way to hang curtains. A double hem is formed at the top of the curtains to which clips are applied and hung from a narrow pole or curtain wire. There are numerous designs and finishes of curtain clips available to blend in with your existing décor.

    Image refers to colour code key for diagrams

    MEASURING AND ESTIMATING FABRIC QUANTITIES

    1. Decide whether you would prefer a wire or a pole and fit it above the window in the chosen position.
    2. Measure the wire or pole and multiply by the fullness ratio (at least 1.5), allowing 3.75cm (1.5”) for side hems. Divide this figure by the width of the fabric to be used and round up to the next whole number. This is the number of widths required.
    3. Measure the length. Remember the length of the clips must be taken into consideration when estimating the finished length. To do this, thread the curtain clips onto the wire or pole and measure the finished length from the top of the clip.
    4. To calculate the cut length, add 10cm (4”) for the bottom hem allowance plus 10cm (4”) for the top hem. If patterned fabric is used, extra will be needed for pattern matching.
    5. To calculate the amount of fabric required, multiply the number of widths by the cut length.

    JOINING WIDTHS OF FABRIC TOGETHER

    1. Lay the first cut length on a flat surface, right side up, and place 12mm (0.5") strip of bonding web along the selvedge edge that is to be joined.

    2. Turn in a 12mm (0.5") seam allowance down the selvedge of the second cut length and press.

      Image refers to step 1 of joining widths of fabric together

      Image refers to steps 3 and 4 of joining widths of fabric together

    3. Place the second length on top of the first length, right side up, with the seam allowance over the bonding strip, matching the pattern on the fabric if necessary.
    4. Press with a hot iron over a damp cloth to seal the seam.
    5. Join other cut lengths in the same way, if necessary. Make sure to add any half widths to the outside edge of each curtain.

    MAKING THE CURTAINS

    Image refers to making no sew curtains

    1. Turn in 12mm (0.5") and then another 2.5cm (1") at each side edge and press.
    2. Place a bonding strip, 2.5cm (1") wide and the length of the curtain, under the fold and press in place with a hot iron over a damp cloth.
    3. Turn up 2.5cm (1") and then another 7.5cm (3") at the lower edge.
    4. Place a bonding strip, 2.5cm (1") wide and long enough for the width of the curtain, under the top fold of the hem and press with a hot iron and a damp cloth to seal.
    5. Turn down a double 5cm (2") hem at the top edge and pin. Check the finished length of the curtain and adjust if necessary.
    6. Place a bonding strip, 5cm (2") wide and long enough for the width of the curtain, under the top fold.
    7. Press with a hot iron and a damp cloth to seal the hem.
    8. Attach the curtain clips to the top fold and hang the curtains.
  • Make your own unlined curtains

    MAKE YOUR OWN UNLINED CURTAINS

     
     

    Image of finished unlined curtainsUnlined curtains are the simplest form of window treatment and are the ideal project for the beginner. They can be made in all weights of fabric from fine voiles to heavyweight tapestries, fitted inside or outside the window recess from a pole or a curtain track.

    Unlined curtains are ideal for a kitchen or bathroom where steam may be a problem and easy laundering is essential.

    Always check that the fabric is washable when it is purchased.

    The following instructions are for curtains with pencil pleat headings and a fullness ratio of 2 (double the width of the window).

    Image refers to colour code key for diagrams

    REQUIREMENTS

    • Fabric of your choice.
    • Matching thread.
    • Pencil pleat heading tape, enough for the flat width of both curtains.

    MEASURING AND ESTIMATING FABRIC QUANTITIES

    1. Fit the track or pole in the required position.
    2. Measure the required finished length.
    3. To calculate the cut length of the fabric, add 8" (20 cms) to the finished length for hem allowances. If you are using a patterned fabric you will need to add extra to allow for pattern matching. If you're not sure how to do this, take a look at our handy 'Matching Patterned Fabric Guide'.
    4. To calculate the number of widths required, measure the length of the track or pole and multiply by the fullness ratio (2). Divide this number by the width of the fabric to be used and round up to the next whole number.
    5. To calculate the amount of fabric you need, multiply the number of widths by the cut length.

    MAKING UNLINED CURTAINS

    Image refers to making unlined curtains

    1. Cut the fabric to the required size, allowing 10cm (4") for side hems and adding 20cm (8") to the length for top and bottom hem allowances. If more than one width is required, join widths together with a 12mm (0.5") French seam. Matching the pattern on the fabric where necessary and adding any half widths to the outside edge of each curtain.
    2. Turn in a double 2.5cm (1") hem at each side and pin.
    3. Turn up a double 7.5cm (3") hem at the lower edge and pin.
    4. Mitre both bottom corners.
    5. Machine or slipstitch all the hems and press.
    6. Turn down 5cm (2") at the top edge and press.
    7. Knot the cords, to the wrong side, at one end of the heading tape and free them, to the right side, at the other end.
    8. Pin the heading tape on the wrong side of the curtain, close to the top fold, turning 2.5cm (1") under at each end to neaten. Position the end with the free cords at the outside edge of the curtain.
    9. Insert a cord tidy bag approximately 5cm (2") in from the outside edge of the curtain.
    10. Stitch the heading tape in place along the top and bottom edges making sure to stitch both sides in the same direction to avoid puckering.
    11. Pull up the cords on the heading tape and adjust the pleats evenly.
    12. Secure the cords with a sliding loop and place them in the cord tidy bag.
    13. Insert curtain hooks into the heading tape and hang the curtains.

    SHARE YOUR CREATION

    We love to see your finished curtains. Share your photos with #LoveMyWindow.

  • Make your own lined curtains

    MAKE YOUR OWN LINED CURTAINS

     
     

    Image of a finished lined curtainAdding a lining to curtains not only enhances the look but also can extend the life of them by protecting the face fabric from sunlight. There are a number of linings to choose from depending on the location of the window. For example blackout lining for bedrooms and thermal lining for living rooms.

    Most curtain headings are suitable for lined curtains including tapes and handmade headings.

    Lined curtains should be dry cleaned as the face fabric and lining can shrink at different rates if they are washed.

    The following instructions are for bag lined curtains (this is where the lining is attached at the top and sides of the face fabric, with the bottom hems worked separately) with pencil pleat heading tape and a fullness ratio of 2 (double the width of the window).

    Image refers to colour code key for diagrams

    REQUIREMENTS:

    • Fabric for the curtains.
    • Lining for the curtains.
    • Matching thread.
    • Pencil pleat heading tape, enough for the flat width of both curtains.

    MEASURING AND ESTIMATING FABRIC QUANTITIES:

    1. Measure the track or pole and multiply by the fullness ratio. Divide this figure by the width of the fabric to be used and round up to the next whole number. This is the number of widths of fabric required.
    2. The number of widths of lining will be the same as the fabric.
    3. Measure the finished length required.
    4. To calculate the cut length, add 20 cms (8") to the finished length for hem allowances. If patterned fabric is used, extra will be needed for pattern matching.
    5. The length of the lining will be the same as the fabric minus any extra for pattern matching.
    6. To calculate the amount of fabric and lining required for the curtains, multiply the number of widths by the cut length.

    MAKING LINED CURTAINS:

    1. Cut the fabric to the required size for each curtain. If more than one width is required, join widths together with a flat seam making sure to add any half widths at the outside edges.
    2. Cut the lining 10cm (4") narrower and 7.5cm (3") shorter than the fabric. If more than one width is required, join widths together with a flat seam making sure to add any half widths at the outside edges.
    3. Turn up a double 5cm (2") hem at the bottom edge of the lining and stitch.Image refers to steps 3 to 5 of making a lined curtain
    4. Turn up a double 7.5cm (3") hem at the bottom edge of the fabric and pin.
    5. Lay the fabric on a flat surface, right side up, and lay the lining on top, wrong side up, so that the top folds of the hems are aligned.
    6. Pin the side edges together matching the raw edges. Stitch down each side edge, 12mm (0.5") in from the raw edges. Stitch down the length of the lining but do not stitch through the hem allowance on the fabric.
    7. Turn right side out, rolling 2.5cm (1") of fabric to the wrong side at each side edge.
    8. Mitre the corners of the hem on the fabric and slipstitch the hem in place.
    9. Turn down 2.5cm (1") along the top edge and press.
    10. Knot the cords at one end of the heading tape, to the wrong side, and free them, to the right side, at the other end.
    11. Place the heading tape along the top edge, close to the fold, on the wrong side. Turn under 2.5cm (1") at each end to neaten and pin.
    12. Image refers to steps 11 to 13 of making lined curtainsMake sure the free ends of the cord are at the outside edge of the curtain.
    13. Place a cord tidy bag under the bottom edge of the heading tape, 2" (5cms) in from the outside edge.
    14. Stitch the heading tape along both edges, through all thicknesses. Work both lines of stitches in the same direction to avoid puckering, attaching the cord tidy bag.
    15. Repeat for the other curtain, making sure to position any half widths, the free ends of the cords and the cord tidy bag at the opposite edge.
    16. Pull up the cords on the heading tapes to the required width and secure them with sliding loops. Roll up the excess cords, place them into the cord tidy bags and adjust the gathers evenly.
    17. Insert curtain hooks into the heading tape and hang.

     

    SHARE YOUR CREATION

    We love to see your finished curtains. Share your photos with #LoveMyWindow.

  • Make your own tab top curtains

    MAKE YOUR OWN TAB TOP CURTAINS

     
     

    If you want a less formal, modern look to your window treatments then tab tops are the answer. They can be made in any weight of fabric from the finest sheers to heavyweights such as velvet and brocade. Image of finished simple unlined tab top curtains

    These stylish curtains need to be made at least 1.5 times the width of the window. The stack back width is the combined width of all the tabs.

    The tabs are positioned at approximately 20cm (8") intervals across the top of the curtain, with one at each end (6 or 7 tabs per width of fabric). The length and width of the tabs can be adjusted to suit your own preference, however to obtain the best effect, the top of the curtain should cover the top of the window frame.

    There are a number of styles of tab top curtain including, button tabs (both lined and unlined), box pleated and gathered which are usually lined.

    The instructions below are for simple unlined tab top curtains, this style has both ends of the tabs stitched into the top hem and needs a fullness ratio of at least 1.5. The tabs have a finished width of 3cm (1.25") but this width can be adjusted for your own preference.

     

    Image refers to colour code key for diagrams

     

    REQUIREMENTS

    • Decorative curtain pole.
    • Suitable curtain fabric.
    • Matching, coordinating or contrasting fabric for the tabs.
    • Matching thread.

    MEASURING AND ESTIMATING FABRIC QUANTITIES

    1. Fit the pole above the window in the required position.
    2. To calculate the number of widths of fabric required, measure the pole between the finials and multiply by the fullness ratio. Divide this number by the width of the fabric to be used and round up to the next whole number.
    3. To calculate the cut length of the fabric for the curtains, measure from the top of the pole to the required length. Deduct the length of the tabs, this should be the length from the top of the pole to 2.5cm (1") above the top of the window frame. To this figure, add 17.5cm (7") for hem allowances. If pattern fabric is used, extra will be needed for pattern matching.
    4. To calculate the amount of fabric, multiply the number of widths by the cut length.
    5. To estimate the number of widths of fabric for the tabs, decide on the number of tabs required for both curtains and multiply by the cut width of each one 7.5cm (3"). Divide this number by the width of the fabric and round up to the next whole number.
    6. To calculate the cut length of the tabs, take the finished length and double it. To this figure add 10cm (4") for seam allowances.
    7. To calculate the amount of fabric for the tabs, multiply the number of widths by the cut length.

    MAKING THE TABS

    1. Image refers to making the tabs for tab top curtainsCut the required number of pieces of fabric, each measuring 7.5cm (3") wide. Cut the length to twice the length required plus 10cm (4”) seam allowance. Example: if the required finished length of the tabs is 7.5cm (3") the tabs need to be cut 25cm (10") long.
    2. Fold each piece in half width ways, right sides together, pin and stitch 6mm (0.25") in from the raw edges down the length.
    3. Turn right side out and press with the seam in the centre of one side.

    MAKING SIMPLE UNLINED TAB TOP CURTAINS

    1. Cut the fabric to the required size, allowing 10cm (4”) for side hems and adding 20cm (8”) to the length for top and bottom hem allowances. If more than 1 width is required join widths together with a 12mm (0.5") French seam, matching the pattern on the fabric where necessary and adding any half widths to the outside edge of each curtain.
    2. Turn in a double 2.5cm (1") hem at each side and pin.
    3. Turn up a double 7.5cm (3") hem at the lower edge and pin.
    4. Mitre both bottom corners.
    5. Machine or slipstitch all the hems and press.Image refers to making simple unlined tab top curtains
    6. Lay the curtain on a flat surface, wrong side up. Turn down a double 2.5cm (1") hem at the top edge and pin.
    7. Fold the tabs in half lengthways to make loops, with the seamed side innermost and pin at approximately 20cm (8") intervals along this edge slipping the raw edges into the hem. There must be a tab at each end with the others spaced evenly and at right angles to the top of the curtain.
    8. Check the length of the curtain including the tabs and adjust if necessary.
    9. Machine stitch or slipstitch the tabs in position close to the top and bottom folds of the hem.
    10. Repeat for the other curtain, making sure to add any half widths to the opposite edge.
    11. Thread the pole through the tabs and hang the curtains, adjusting the folds if required.
  • Make your own cafe curtains

    MAKE YOUR OWN CAFE CURTAINS

     
     

    A double layered cafe curtainCafe curtains are an economical way of screening the lower part of a window to give privacy. They can be used in any room of the home but are ideal in the kitchen.

    Cafe Curtains

    Rods, decorative poles or curtain wires can be used to hang cafe curtains and they are positioned inside the window recess, either halfway down the window or at the height of a glazing bar. For a layered look, matching cafe curtains can be made with 1 positioned at the top of the window, to represent a valance, and 1 positioned halfway down the window. They can be made to overlap, giving total privacy or the top one can be made shorter to leave a gap in the centre to allow light into the room.

    The instructions below are for an unlined style of cafe curtain which can be made in lace, sheer or lightweight fabric with a fullness ratio of between 1.5 and 2.5 depending on your own preference. For net curtain fabric visit our sister shop Net Curtains Direct.

     The rod, pole or wire is slotted through a casing to gather the curtain. It is positioned 1" (2.5 cms) down from the top fold forming a frill along the top edge.

     Image refers to colour code key for the diagrams

     

     

    REQUIREMENTS

    • Fabric
    • Matching thread
    • Rod, pole or curtain wire to fit inside the window recess

     

     

    MEASURING AND ESTIMATING FABRIC QUANTITIES

    1. Position the rod, pole or curtain wire at the required height and fix.
    2. Measure the width, inside the window recess. Multiply this by the fullness ratio and divide by the width of the fabric to be used. Round up to the next whole number. This is the number of widths of fabric needed.
    3. To calculate the cut length, measure from the top of the rod, pole or wire to the required length [usually 0.5" (12 mm) up from the window sill]. To this measurement add 6" (15 cms) for hem allowances. If patterned fabric is used, extra will be needed for pattern matching.
    4. Multiply the number of widths by the cut length to calculate the amount of fabric required.

     

    MAKING A CAFE CURTAIN WITH A CASED HEADING

    1. Cut the fabric to the required size. If more than one width is required, join widths together with a French seam and matching the pattern where necessary. Position a full width in the centre with equal part widths at the outside edges of the curtain.
    2. Turn in a double 12 mm (0.5") hem down both side edges and pin.
    3. Turn up a double 2.5cm (1") hem along the bottom edge and pin.
    4. Mitre the bottom corners and stitch the side and bottom hems.
    5. Turn down 2.5cm (1") along the top edge and press the fold with your fingers.
    6. Turn down another 5cm (2") along the top edge and pin.
    7. Stitch the top hem in place close to the bottom fold.

    Image refers to steps 8 and 9 of making a cafe curtain

    SHARE YOUR CREATION

    We'd love to see your finished curtains. Share your photos with #LoveMyWindow.

  • Make your own hourglass curtains

    MAKE YOUR OWN HOURGLASS CURTAINS

     
     

    Image of a finished hourglass curtainAn hourglass curtain is one that is fitted to a door - flowing sheer curtains covering doors can be a nuisance as they tend to get caught when the door is used.  An hourglass curtain solves this problem by adding a second rod at the lower edge and when it is tied in the centre with a bow of ribbon you can create a focal point from an ordinary door. Hourglass curtains are also ideal for covering French or patio doors and windows. However, if the door or window is very wide, we would suggest making more than one curtain across the width.

    To achieve the best results allow 2 – 2.5 times the width of the rod and cut the top and bottom of the fabric on a curve. If using a lace fabric with shaped or scalloped selvedges, adjust the fullness ratio to accommodate the width of the fabric.

     

    Image refers to colour code key for the diagrams

     

    REQUIREMENTS

    • Sheer, net or lightweight fabric.
    • 2 net rods or wires.
    • Matching thread.
    • Ribbon, approximately 5cm (2") wide and long enough to tie in a bow around the waist of the curtain, approximately 1 metre.
     

    MEASURING AND ESTIMATING FABRIC QUANTITIES

    1. Attach the rods/wires to the door or window, approximately 2.5cm (1") above and below the glass.Image refers to measuring for a hourglass curtain
    2. Measure the vertical length between the rods. Call this CL (centre length).
    3. Mark the glass half way between the rods.
    4. Determine the width of the "waist" and mark the glass.
    5. To calculate the outer length of the curtain measure the curve from the end of the top rod to the end of the bottom rod curving the tape in to meet the "waist". Call this OL (outside length).
    6. To calculate the cut length for the outside length (OL) add 20cm (8”) for hem allowances.
    7. To calculate the number of widths required, measure the length of the rod or wire and multiply by the fullness ratio. Divide this figure by the width of the fabric to be used and round up to the next whole number.
    8. To calculate the amount of fabric required, multiply the cut length by the number of widths.
     

    MAKING THE HOURGLASS CURTAIN

    1. Cut the fabric to OL with added 20cm (8”) hem allowance, this includes a 2.5cm (1") frill at the top and the bottom edges.  If you don't want the frill, simply deduct 5cm (2") from the added 20cm.
    2. If more than one width is required, join widths together with a French seam. Position a full width in the centre with equal part widths added at each side.
    3. To neaten the sides, if necessary, turn under a double 12mm (0.5") hem and stitch.
    4. Fold the curtain in half width ways right sides together.Image refers to making an hourglass curtain
    5. Measure a distance equal to OL minus CL divided by 2, down from the top along the folded edge and mark.
    6. Draw a curve from this mark to the outer top corner.
    7. Repeat steps 4 and 5 for the lower edge. The distance between the marks should equal CL plus 20cm (8”).
    8. Cut along the curves at the top and the lower edges.
    9. To sew the casings turn under 2.5cm (1") and then another 5cm (2") at the top and the lower curves and pin.
    10. Work a first row of stitches 2.5cm (1") in from the fold and another row of stitches 5cm (2") from the fold, following the curve. Do this at both the top and the lower edges. Press.
    11. Thread the net rods/wires between the rows of stitches and adjust the pleats evenly.
    12. Tie a ribbon bow around the centre of the curtain to form the "waist".

     

    SHARE YOUR CREATION

    We love to see your finished curtains. Share your photos with #LoveMyWindow.

  • Make your own curtains with an attached valance

    MAKE YOUR OWN CURTAINS WITH AN ATTACHED VALANCE

     
     

    Attaching a valance to the top of curtains means that you can have the enhanced look of a double layer without the need for two tracks. This is especially useful where space is a premium.

    There are a number of ways of adding a valance to the top of curtains. A separate valance can be added to the top of each curtain - this style is used when the curtains need to be opened and closed. When a single valance is attached across the top of a pair of curtains they will need to be held open with tie backs or hold backs as the heading is stationary. Both these styles of valance are usually unlined whether they are attached to lined or unlined curtains. This cuts down on the bulk of fabric along the top edge and can be used with most heading styles. They can be made to match, coordinate or contrast with the fabric of the curtains and to accentuate the edge of the valance, fringing or cord can be attached to the bottom edge. Another way is to make the curtains much longer than is necessary and turn the top over to represent a valance. Single or double layers of fabric are usually bound around the edges for this style.

    The instructions below are for a single valance attached to a pair of curtains with fringing on the bottom edge.

    Image refers to colour code key for the diagrams


    REQUIREMENTS

    • Fabric for the curtains
    • Lining for the curtains
    • Matching or contrasting fabric for the valance
    • Matching thread
    • Fringing, enough for the bottom edge
    • Pencil pleat heading tape, enough for the flat width of both curtains
    • Pair of tie backs and tie back hooks

    MEASURING AND ESTIMATING FABRIC QUANTITIES

    FOR THE CURTAINS

    1. Measure the track or pole and multiply by the fullness ratio. Divide this figure by the width of the fabric to be used and round up to the next whole number. This is the number of widths of fabric required.
    2. The number of widths of lining will be the same as the fabric.
    3. Measure the finished length required.
    4. To calculate the cut length, add 20cm (8") to the finished length for hem allowances. If patterned fabric is used, extra will be needed for pattern matching.
    5. The length of the lining will be the same as the fabric minus any extra for pattern matching.
    6. To calculate the amount of fabric required for the curtains, multiply the number of widths by the cut length.

    FOR THE VALANCE

    1. The flat width of the valance will need to be the same as that of both curtains to which it will be attached, adding 10cm (4") for side hems.
    2. The length should be approximately 1/6th of the finished curtain length, with a minimum of 15cm (6"). However, this can be adjusted to suit your own preference. To calculate the cut length, add 7.5cm (3") for the top and bottom hems to the finished length. If more than one width is required, extra will be needed for pattern matching where necessary.
    3. To calculate the amount of fabric required, multiply the number of widths by the cut length.
      To calculate the total amount of fabric required, add the amount required for the curtains to the amount required for the valance.

    MAKING THE CURTAINS

    1. Cut the fabric to the required size for each curtain. If more than 1 width is required, join widths together with a flat seam making sure to add any half widths at the outside edges.Image refers to steps 3 to 5 of making a curtain with an attached valance
    2. Cut the lining 10cm (4") narrower and 7.5cm (3") shorter than the fabric. If more than one width is required, join widths together with a flat seam making sure to add any half widths at the outside edges.
    3. Turn up a double 5cm (2") hem at the bottom edge of the lining and stitch.
    4. Turn up a double 7.5cm (3") hem at the bottom edge of the fabric and pin.
    5. Lay the fabric on a flat surface, right side up, and lay the lining on top, wrong side up, so that the top folds of the hems are aligned.
    6. Pin the side edges together matching the raw edges. Stitch down each side edge, 12mm (0.5") in from the raw edges. Stitch down the length of the lining but do not stitch through the hem allowance on the fabric.
    7. Turn right side out, rolling 2.5cm (1") of fabric to the wrong side at each side edge.
    8. Mitre the corners of the hem on the fabric and slipstitch the hem in place.

    MAKING AND ADDING A VALANCE TO A PAIR OF CURTAINS

    1. Cut the fabric to the required length. If more than one width of fabric is required, join widths together with a French seam. Make sure to add any half widths to the outside edges and match the pattern where necessary.
    2. Turn in a double 2.5cm (1") hem down both side edges and along the bottom and pin. Mitre both bottom corners, stitch the hems in place and press.
    3. Pin the fringing along the bottom edge, close to the fold, turning in 2.5cm (1") at each end to neaten. Backstitch in place.
    4. Image refers to steps 4 to 8 of making a curtain with an attached valancePlace the valance on a flat surface, wrong side up.
    5. Place both curtains on top, wrong side up, matching the outside edges. Make sure the curtains butt together in the centre and the top edges are aligned.
    6. Turn down 2.5cm (1") at the top edge and press.
    7. Free the cords at both ends of the heading tape.
    8. Place the heading tape along the top edge, close to the fold, on the wrong side. Turn under 2.5cm (1") at each end to neaten and pin.
    9. Place a cord tidy bag under the bottom edge of the heading tape, 5cm (2") in from each outside edge.
    10. Stitch the heading tape along both edges, through all thicknesses. Work both lines of stitches in the same direction to avoid puckering, attaching the cord tidy bags.
    11. Pull up the cords on the heading tape from both ends, to the required width, and secure them with sliding loops. Roll up the excess cords, place them into the cord tidy bags and adjust the gathers evenly.
    12. Insert curtain hooks into the heading tape and hang.
    13. Fix the tie back hooks at a convenient height at each side of the window.
    14. Drape the curtains, adjust the folds and hold in place with the tie backs.
    15. Insert curtain hooks into the heading tape and hang.

    SHARE YOUR CREATION

    We love to see your finished curtains. Share your photos with #LoveMyWindow.

  • Matching Pattern Fabric

    MATCHING PATTERNED FABRIC

    Whatever you are making it is inevitable that sooner or later you will have to join widths of fabric together. This is simple until there is a pattern to contend with. All patterned fabrics have a repeated pattern down their lengths. This is called the "pattern repeat" and is measured from a point in one pattern to the same point in the next pattern.

    Most patterned fabrics match horizontally across the width. All the cut lengths have to start at the same point in the pattern so that they match at the seams when they are joined. Therefore a cut length has to be a multiple of the pattern repeat.

    For curtains, where large patterns are used it is better to have a full pattern at the hemline and a part pattern in the heading where it is less noticeable.

    YOU WILL NEED:

    • Patterned fabric, browse our fabrics
    • A large flat surface
    • Pins and safety pins
    • Tape measure
    • Dressmaking chalk pencil, or similar
    • Scissors
    • Sewing machine

    STEP 1: CUTTING OUT

    It is advisable to check the fabric for faults before it is cut because suppliers will not exchange cut lengths.

    1. Lay the fabric, right side up, on a large flat surface with the top of the pattern at the top.
    2. Measure the first length along the selvedge (the woven outside edge of the fabric), positioning the pattern where it is required and mark with a pin. Do not cut until all the required lengths have been measured to ensure that there is sufficient fabric.
    3. Measure the required number of pattern repeats from the pin and mark.
    4. Repeat this until the required number of lengths have been marked.
    5. At each mark cut the fabric at right angles to the selvedge. As each length is cut place a safety pin on the right side at the top to ensure that all the lengths will be joined the correct way up. This is more important when using double-sided patterned fabrics or ones with two-way designs.
    6. If a half width of fabric is required, fold one length in half, matching the selvedges. Press along the fold.
    7. Unfold the fabric and cut along the fold. Mark the right side at the top of each half width.

    STEP 2: STITCHING WIDTHS TOGETHER

    1. Place one cut length, right side up, on a flat surface.
    2. Place a second cut length, wrong side up, on top, matching the top raw edges and the selvedges.
    3. Turn back the seam allowance down the length of the top piece of fabric and press the fold with your finger.
    4. Adjust the position of the top piece of fabric until the pattern matches at the fold.
    5. Working down the length of the fabric, release the folded edge and pin both pieces of fabric together, along the fold when the pattern is matched. This fold will be the stitching line.
    6. Check that the pattern is matched correctly from the right side.
    7. Machine stitch along the fold.
    8. Repeat this procedure until the required widths of fabric have been joined together. Add half widths at the outside edge of curtains but always join them at the selvedge.
    9. Make sure that the bottom edge is straight across all the widths and trim if necessary.
    10. Measure the length required from the bottom raw edge and cut off the excess fabric where necessary.


  • Curtains Terms Explained

    What is meant by "curtain drop"?

    This is the length or height of the curtain. This is normally the height from the curtain pole to either to just above or just below the window sill, or to the floor.

     

    What is "fullness" and "gather" in a curtain?

    The gather and fullness refers to the width of material in each curtain. You may notice that most window curtains do not lie flat. Traditionally curtains are hung so that they fall into soft folds. The folds also known as "gather" or "fullness" are created by increasing your width 2x to 3x your flat window reveal size. There are many advantages of gathering your curtains, the most common is for greater privacy and insulation as well as for aesthetic reasons. However, it is becoming more popular to hang curtains as flat panels with latest sleek boutique fashion trends. This will impact the width of curtain you select.

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